Alexander Hamilton

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The main character of the Federalist groups of aristocrats, Alexander Hamilton was a key component to early development of the United States of America. Hamilton was epitome of a Federalist; an economic and political wizard, he was able to jumpstart the American economy in the toddler years of this great country. He was a well-respected Patriot by most people, yet at the same time a very arrogant, self-promoter who believed he was more intelligent than any of his political opponents, including Thomas Jefferson.

Hamilton was a very outspoken man with a bad case of a superiority complex. Hamilton firmly believed if the aristocratic society had control of the government, they would put large amounts of money into the government, which would then trickle down to the lower classes of the nation. He also felt the hoi polloi of society was not capable of running the government because they were a very selfish and egocentric people who constantly serve for their ambitions and not for the good of the nation.

Hamilton also put a lot of trust into his idea of a strong central government and that it would bring peace and liberty between the states and serve as a barrier against domestic insurrection because of the wealth brought upon by the aristocratic class.

Hamilton's brilliant idea of assumption led the United States to become a much closer knit country that was able rid the states of the debts they had incurred from the war of independence, hence the nation should share these debts and move on. These weakened the states power and in turn, put greater resort into the federal government, which allowed the states to hook on to the so-called "federal chariot". This also led to a controversial speculation where northern risk-takers bought national securities from ill-educated southern anti-federalist at a low price. The securities then rose in value as the scheme of assumption was passed, and the well-educated risk takers made off with a large amount of money. Hamilton claimed that the southern people voluntarily parted with their property and still made money but just not as much as the educated men from the north.

This financial mind, who was now the Secretary of Treasury and came up with his superb idea of a National Bank of the United States. His proposition was excellent in issuing monetary notes that would finally be worth the amount of money they had been issued for. His idea was also crucial in facilitating public transactions and give great ease to collecting tax money as well as protect the surplus of tax money. The National Bank was also able to regulate trade and provide a common and stronger defense for this weak nation.

Hamilton, a key personality in American history, started the great patriotism one had for his country and ability to help move his country into better standards and ways of life. Hamilton's role in the writing of the Federalist papers presented the United States with a strong central government, which still exists to this day. Along with his writing he was also crucial in developing an economy for the new nation with his contributions to finance and administration while holding office of Secretary of Treasury. Hamilton is considered one of his era's greatest national contributors, remembered for his benefaction to the country's freedom and posterity.