CLEAN NEEDLES BENEFIT SOCIETY/PROGRAMS DON'T MAKE SENSE

Essay by ladyheart143College, UndergraduateA+, December 2007

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Argument Evaluation AssignmentArticle 1: CLEAN NEEDLES BENEFIT SOCIETY1. Identify at least two arguments.

Argument 1:•The 37 cities trying needle exchanges are accumulating impressive data that they are an effective tool against spread of an epidemic now in its 13th year.

2. Outline the argument premises and conclusions.

Premises:•55% of used needles show traces of AIDS virus.

•In New Haven, new HIV infections are down 33% for addicts in exchanges.

Conclusion:•Needle exchanges have proven their benefit.

3. Identify whether the premises support the conclusions.

•Yes4. Identify whether the premises are reasonable.

•Yes5. Explain how you came to decisions about article arguments.

•Both premises give impressive data to back up the argument that needle exchanges are an effective tool against the spread of an epidemic (Aids). The premises support the conclusion that needle exchanges prove their benefit.

Argument 2:•Needle exchange is a soundly based counterattack against an epidemic.

2. Outline the argument premises and conclusions.

Premises:•Evidence shows drug users will seek out clean needles to cut chances of almost certain death from AIDS.

•(Some 28% of AIDS cases are IV drug users.) And AIDS treatment costs taxpayers far more than the price of a few needles.

Conclusion:•They should be encouraged and expanded.

3. Identify whether the premises support the conclusions.

•Yes4. Identify whether the premises are reasonable.

•Yes5. Explain how you came to decisions about article arguments.

Though the first premise seems to be more of an opinion because there is not any specific evidence provided, the second premise gives facts to prove that 28% of aids victims are IV drug users who logically could spread the disease further by sharing needles. Both premises logically lead to the conclusion that the needle exchange should be encouraged because it is cheaper than the cost of Aids treatment.

Article 2: PROGRAMS DON'T MAKE SENSE1. Identify at least two arguments.

Argument 1:•It's wrong to attempt to ease one crisis by reinforcing another.

2. Outline the argument premises and conclusions.

Premises:•Inconclusive data on experimental needle-distribution programs is no excuse to weaken federal substance-abuse laws.

•In a Hartford, Conn., needle-distribution program, for example, drug addicts are demanding taxpayer-funded needles at four times the expected rate.

Conclusion:•Inconsistency and incompetence will undermine the public's confidence in government health-care initiatives regarding drug abuse and the AIDS epidemic.

3. Identify whether the premises support the conclusions.

•Yes4. Identify whether the premises are reasonable.

•Yes5. Explain how you came to decisions about article arguments.

•It is true that the first premise is more of an opinion, but it is backed up the facts in the opinion in premise number two. Both premises show how the public's confidence can be undermined in government health-care initiatives from the experimental needle-distribution causing drug addicts to demand taxpayer-funded needles at four times the expected rate.

Argument 2:•It's wrong to tolerate a contradictory policy that spends people's hard-earned money to facilitate deviant behavior.

Premises:•No government bureaucrat can refute the fact that fresh, free needles make it easier to inject illegal drugs because their use results in less pain and scarring.

•Underwriting dangerous, criminal behavior is illogical: If you subsidize something, you'll get more of it.

Conclusion:•The Clinton administration proposal of giving away needles hurts far more people than [it is] intended to help.

3. Identify whether the premises support the conclusions.

•Yes4. Identify whether the premises are reasonable.

•Yes5. Explain how you came to decisions about article arguments.

•The first premise shows how free needles can lead to deviant behavior and the second explains how financial support of addicts can cause more abuse. Both premises support the fact that the Clinton administration proposal of giving away needles hurts far more people than [it is] intended to help.