Essay by PaperNerd ContributorCollege, Undergraduate November 2001

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The American Constitution was written strictly because of the framers' self-interest. The framers of the Constitution were worried about the future of their property, status, and their right to govern the future United States. The "fathers"� also wanted a government that would make good on public debt. To solve these problems, the framers met in seclusion without telling anyone and took it upon themselves to decide what the rest of the colonists would need and want as their government.

Because the Articles of Confederation lacked national power and central government, America's elite feared that the financial situation was on a downfall. The framers of the Constitution were the elite of America; they were worried about this decline in commerce. They felt that the only way to secure a stable future for them was to set out specifics for a government where the national sect had supreme authority over each individual state and one that promoted industry and trade.

Under the newly written Constitution, the federal government had control over all things involving money (i.e. regulate commerce, control currency, etc) and it limited states powers, but said that any power not given nor taken from the states by the Constitution was reserved to the states. By adding structure to the United States government, the "fathers"� created a stable environment for commerce to grow and prosper therefore keeping the elite's financial situation secure.

The "Founding Fathers"� were extremely concerned about their status in the colonies. If they lost the security of an elite leading their future country, then the future of their newfound republic would be lost. When the "Fathers"� wrote the Constitution, they were assuring their role in society. Several standards were set for being in a political position that still stand today; each of the "Founding Fathers"� was a white,