A description of mythological creatures found in the 'Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe' by C. S. Lewis and their origin

Essay by nsbhsJunior High, 7th gradeA+, September 2006

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A dwarf (modern plural dwarfs, older variant is dwarves) is a short humanoid creature in Norse mythology as well as fairy tales, fantasy fiction and role-playing games. Dwarves are much like humans, but generally living underground or in mountainous areas. Here they have heaped up countless treasures of gold, silver, and precious stones, and pass their time in fabricating costly armour. They are famed miners and smiths although, like humans, they specialize in any number of trades. Generally shorter than humans, they are on average stockier and hairier, usually sporting full beards. Dwarfish smiths created some of the greatest and most powerful items of power in Norse mythology, such as the magic ribbon which bound the wolf, Fenris.


In Greek mythology, satyrs are mythological half-man and half-goat nature entities that roamed the woods and mountains, and were the companions of Pan and Dionysus.

Satyrs are most commonly described as having the upper half of a man and the lower half of a goat or, less commonly, the lower half of a horse.

They are also described as possessing a long thick tail, either that of a goat or a horse. Mature satyrs are often depicted with goat's horns, while juveniles are often shown with bony nubs on their foreheads.

They are described as roguish but faint-hearted folk -- subversive and dangerous, yet shy and cowardly. They are lovers of wine, women and boys, and are ready for every physical pleasure. They roam to the music of pipes, cymbals, castanets, and bagpipes, and love to dance with the nymphs (with whom they are obsessed, and whom they often pursue), and have a special form of dance called 'sikinnis'. Because of their love of wine, they are often represented holding wine-cups, and appear often in the decorations on wine-cups.