Elizabeth Jennings Graham

Essay by TheJokerElementary School, 5th grade February 2008

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Elizabeth Jennings was a famous African American woman to refuse from getting up from her seat in a bus. This was on Sunday, July 16, 1854. Jennings was on her way to the First Congregational Church on 6th Street and 2nd Avenue. She was on a bus when the conductor commanded her to get off the bus and she refused to.

To begin with, Elizabeth Jennings Graham was a very good woman who believed in equal rights. She wanted to sit wherever she wanted to sit on the bus. That’s why she was involved in the civil rights movement. Thomas Jennings was her father and he was involved in the movement as well. They fought for rights that they should be able to have.

For example, Elizabeth Jennings Graham made history. She was the first black woman to refuse from getting up from her seat on a bus. Elizabeth was getting on a bus with her friend on their way to church.

Elizabeth was a 24 year old school teacher and that was one of her friends from her job. Elizabeth was going to church to perform as an organist. She was late. Elizabeth heard the conductor saying that no colored should be on the bus. The conductor told her to get off, but she refused. So they argued until the conductor finally let Elizabeth get on the bus.

In addition, Elizabeth Jennings Graham was a 24 year old school teacher who was on her way to church. Elizabeth was getting on a bus at the intersection of Pearl and Chatham Streets when she simply refused to get off the bus. She was going to the First Congregational Church on 6th Street and 2nd Avenue.

In conclusion, Elizabeth Jennings Graham was the first black woman to refuse from getting up from her seat on a bus when she didn’t even get on yet. She had every right to be on the bus. So she argued with the conductor until he finally let her get on it. But later on, a white came and had nowhere to sit. So Jennings had to give up her seat this time. So she took her case to court and she sued the conductor, the driver and the company.

Greider, Katherine Pathfinders: The Schoolteacher's Stand, American Legacy magazine, Summer 2006, Pg. 12