Essay by hungusUniversity, Master'sA+, May 2005

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The topic of globalization is such a multi-layered topic that is almost impossible to make a concrete definition. It affects every sphere of our life- economical, political and social. It is present everywhere in public discourse. Even with the wide use of this concept, there does not appear to be any precise, widely-agreed definition of it. In every single instance the world "globalization" seems to have a different meaning in a different situation. A generally accepted definition is a "process fueled by, and resulting in, increasing cross-border flows of goods, services, money, people, information, and culture" (Guillen). Many other theories of what globalization entails have been proposed by numerous scholars. In Mauro Guillen's essay, he proposes to combine the perspectives of sociologists Roland Robertson and Martin Albrow, and define globalization as "a process leading to greater interdependence and mutual (reflexivity) among economic, political and social units in the world, and among actors in general."

Because the basis of this essay is resting on the combined perspectives of these two sociologists, it is necessary to check the credibility of these men. After visiting the University of Aberdeen websitee (where Robertson is currently a professor of sociology) I was very convinced of the credibility of this man. He has won numerous awards for his journals, books, and essays on globalization. Much of his work has been translated into 10 different languages and he has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of Mathematical Sociology, the Review of Religious Research, Sociological Analysis, Theory, Culture and Society, the Journal of International Communication, and Citizenship Studies. Martin Albrow has a Ph. D. of Sociology from the University of Cambridge. He is a former professor and a pioneer on the study of cultural and global aspects of globalization. His book, The Global Age,