Essay by PaperNerd ContributorHigh School, 12th grade October 2001

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Grendel The first night after I have been lurking near Herot, I make my first raid, creeping luridly into the mead-hall, slaughtering thirty men, and carrying their bloody bodies off to my lair. Hothgar and his Danes mourn sorrowfully for the deaths of their kinsmen.

The next night I come again, killing and eating all the Danes in Herot who do not flee from the mead-hall. Herot is left empty for twelve years. King Hothgar and his people are left to grieve over the triumph of my evilness. I do not dare to touch Hothgar's throne though it is protected by God.

The warriors among the Danes debate possible solutions, and make pagan vows, hoping for anything to stop my massacres on his men in Herot. Beowulf expresses his desire to destroy me known by all, and I welcome him to my lair to be destroyed like his cowardly Danes. Beowulf and I, now call to battle by the power of King Hothgar, because of our equal strength and thirst for vengeance. Beowulf thinks he can defeat me with no weapons as I've done to his men.

" And if death does take me, send the hammer Mail of my armor to Higlac, return the inheritance I had from Hrethel, and he from Wayland. Fate will unwind as it must!" -Beowulf- I have been defeated by the strong hearted man Beowulf, in his bloody vengeance over me.

( His wide journey back to Herot to behold the physical evidence of my struggle.) Unsympathetic over the death of I, Grendel.

" Gaped with no sense of sorrow, felt no regret for his suffering, went tracing his bloody footprints, his beaten and lonely flight, to the edge if the lake where he'd dragged his corpselike way, doomed and weary of his vanishing life ".