Hamlet         Even in the first act of Hamlet one can

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Hamlet Even in the first act of Hamlet one can see that the relationships of the characters will play a major role in the outcome of this famous Shakespearean play. The development of these associations is played out as early as scene IV and will be evident throughout the story until the final tragic moments.

One of the most compelling relationships described in the story is that which occurs between King Hamlet (the ghost) and his son, Hamlet. From the moment of his arrival in Denmark after his father's death, one can see that Hamlet is distraught over the events of the past two months. He senses corruption in what has taken place and this feeling is soon confirmed when the spirit of his "Loyal Dane" confronts him. In Act I, Scene V, line 12, the Ghost demands Hamlet, "So art thou revenge, when thou shalt hear." The former King is requesting of Hamlet that his killer, Claudius, now the King, get his due; and Hamlet more than willingly agrees.

He is obedient to his father and they retain a relationship of mutual respect and trust even after this "foul and most unnatural murder." Hamlet's quest is to avenge his father's wrongful death and will not be deterred until such is completed.

Contrary to the relationship to Hamlet and the ghost, that between Polonius, the chief counselor to the throne, and his son Laertes is certainly not one of mutual trust but a superficial alliance. Although it is obvious that Polonius loves him son dearly and only wants the best for him, he goes way beyond what is necessary to assure his well being. While Laertes is away at school in Paris, Polonius sends some of his men to spy on his innocent son and make sure he is not involved in any wrongdoing. However his honorable son knows not of what his fathers does and as a result in act I, scene III, line 88, we see how much respect Laertes shows for his father with the words, "Most humbly do I take my leave, my lord." The relationship between Polonius and his daughter, Ophelia, is somewhat stale from there actions exhibited in act I. She is a polite, respectful, and very obedient young woman. She takes all of her father's insight to heart even though it might not agree with her ideas on the situation. She is involved with Hamlet, which displeases her father because he believes Hamlet does not truly love her as shown by act I, scene III, line 110 where he declares, "Affection, puh! You speak like a green girl unsifted in such perilous circumstance." Although she feels differently, she appreciates her father's views and takes them into consideration.

One can see that in the play Hamlet, written by William Shakespeare, relationships are a major factor in the outcome of the story. Throughout the remainder of the story these associations will correlate and provide much drama and suspense for the reader. Although each character displays different ways of interacting with one another, all will help bring about the tragic ending to come.