Essay by PaperNerd ContributorHigh School, 11th grade September 2001

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When I was first given this assignment, I would have to say that I have never been more uninterested in doing homework in my life. I've never been interested in history of any kind, which would explain my failures to participate in class and so when I first stepped into the Museum of Tolerance I didn't expect it to make me want to learn and I certainly did not expect one museum visit to change my whole perspective on what human life used to be. But it has in a way I never could have imagined.

At the Museum of Tolerance, the first thing I saw was a mini-video that had clips of an interview with William Pierce who wrote "The Turner Diaries,"� which was found in Timothy McVeigh's possession when he was arrested. The video also had clips of groups of African-American men making stereotypical remarks toward the white-Americans.

They spoke of how for every black man who didn't have a gun, there was a white man with at least one gun. This is obviously a stereotype because not every white man owned a gun. The leader of the group, whose name I did not catch, had even said that he "wished they would show movies with white men being killed to the point where the blood flowed into the popcorn."� This particular clip had a huge effect on me. I've heard of African-Americans being oppressed by the white-Americans since they created slave codes of the pre-civil war era that were later replaced by segregation laws and practices to discriminate against the blacks. But I never realized that the African-Americans of today still feel now, the way the African-Americans of that time felt towards the white-Americans.

Then I went into an area that was called "The Point of View...