Essay by PaperNerd ContributorHigh School, 10th grade October 2001

download word file, 3 pages 0.0

Downloaded 348 times

JUBILEE In Jubilee, Vyry the child of a white plantation owner, as well as his black mistress, is introduced with the brutality of the south. She was a slave, whom was abandoned by exceedingly great people present in her life. Vyry was faced with the struggles of raising children, cooking, and the hard times of being a slave. She suffered the hardships of wartime, and the continuous taunts by the KKK. Her movement through time is a continuous process of dissolution, absorption, conversation, and realignment. Vyry's life was complex, however, through hard work and perseverance, her life began to come likely as she dreamed.

Strength was definitely apart of Vyry's will. Being brought into the world by a white man, and yet neglected by him, as well as his wife was a difficult issue to face. She somewhat found herself in some difficult situations. Often being shut down as a child.

Let alone being a slave at such an age. Such situations include being referred to as a nigger. As a child, Vyry was downed by her step mother (Big Missy). "Niggers don't wear curls, do they Caline?" However, by Vyry having the abilities to overcome the ignorance of people, her strength increased tremendously. By Vyry's strength being so effective, it enhanced an intellectual dialogue between herself, along with her master (father). Vyry wished to be free one day. Moreover, Master John once told Vyry that the only way that she'd be freed is if he died. As a result he did die. However, she still was not granted her freedom. Through this incident, Vyry became more mentally powerful. Strength was indeed an important characteristic Vyry endured. Despite the closures brought upon her, nothing could ever presume Vyry's strength.

It was Vyry's strength that uplifted her joy. Furthermore, at times, strength, courage, and wisdom were just not enough to get by. There were times when Vyry, as well as her family truly had dilemmas present in their lives. Firstly, after the war was over, slavery was abolished, and the slaves were set free. Vyry along with her family were baffled with the matters of finding a place to live. Vyry's family was encountered with numerous of problems in the process of finding a house. Firstly, they were flooded, then they were cheated out of money, and finally, Vyry was attacked and they were forced to leave in demand by the KKK. Suffering through these outrageous conflicts allowed Vyry's family to become a complete setback.

The setback caused a lot of commotion. However, it did allow Vyry, as well as her family to find something new, and yet great. The issues that were present throughout Vyry's life gave her family the privilege to find something new. It allowed them to find things to better themselves. To be more exact, Jim, Vyry's son was finally introduced to his father (Randall Ware), other than Innis Brown. He left to better himself, and become a teacher. Moreover, Vyry proceeded to perform a great deed for a local white woman. Thus, in return, they helped build a house for Vyry, and her family. Vyry was given a job, and was promised the protection from any harmful source.

In conclusion, Vyry's downfalls were a complete uplift in the ending. Although she was a slave, her courage and individual strength allowed her to finally reach the promise land. As a child, Vyry faced so much. She was wedged with being called a nigger, and being brought into the world by a white man, whom was also her Master. She was promised freedom. However, this promise was reneged. Lastly, Vyry was attacked by the KKK, and was forced to leave her home. Furthermore, the obstacles Vyry received throughout life was an enhancement that built hope. From childhood to adulthood, hope was Vyry's big alteration. Hope became apart of Vyry's strength. Moreover, Vyry's strength allowed her to finally fulfill her hopes and dreams.