The life and accomplishements as well as trials of James Weldon Johnson.

Essay by kadib2mchHigh School, 11th gradeA+, April 2003

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Abstract

Johnson was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise Johnson. Johnson's father, James Johnson, was born a freeman and was of mixed ancestry. Even though, he is no longer living, James Weldon Johnson has left much about his contributions to African American literature. He was a writer, diplomat, professor, and editor, who also described himself as a man of letters and a civil rights leader. He was the author of the Black National Anthem "Lift Every Voice and Sing" and he will always be remembered for his great contributions not only to blacks, but also to America.

James Weldon Johnson, was born June 17,1871 in Jacksonville, Florida to James and Helen Louise Johnson. Mr. James Johnson taught his son how to speak Spanish as a young boy. Johnson's mother, Helen Johnson, was born a free woman in the West Indies. Mrs. Helen was a woman of French and Black ancestry.

She was the first black American to teach in the state of Florida. Mrs. Helen also taught her son to play the guitar (Otfinoski 22). Johnson was born the second of three children: John Rosamond, also known as "Rozy," and a sister that died shortly after birth (Logan and Winston, " James Weldon Johnson" 353). He was originally named Johnson "James William Johnson," by his parents, but in 1913, he changed his middle name to Weldon (Kranz, "James Weldon Johnson" 78). Even though, he is no longer living, James Weldon Johnson has left much about his contributions to African American literature. He was a writer, diplomat, professor, and editor, who also described himself as a man of letters and a civil rights leader, Johnson was a well-educated man of his time.

During his first few years of school he attended, Stanton,