The Man

Essay by PaperNerd ContributorCollege, Undergraduate September 2001

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Conveniently constructed at the intersection of a railroad crossing and a busy main street, my apartment complex is serenaded by traffic during the day and the roaring of trains during the night. Many families live in the complex so the walkways and parking lot is infested with playful children and cluttered with diversity. People share their taste of music and the aroma of lighter fluid with their neighbors as they start their barbecues in the little patios they have available, regardless of whether or not the rest of us like it. My apartment complex isn't very impressive to look at and the conditions aren't very comfortable sometimes, but it does demonstrate a sense of humility and we're thankful.

An outsider who doesn't understand that this is home may be more considerable of the safety of being in my apartment complex. Visitors might have some trouble pulling into the driveway due to the thick traffic.

Then they would probably be irritated by the fact that they must slow down in the parking lot, otherwise they will hit a little kid who will run out from hiding behind a car. They would probably be a little intimidated by the group of teenage minorities who loiter in the parking lot. The complex is separated into sections, and the entrances to each section has a gas powered laundry room that gives off a smell that can make you nauseous. Children who aren't careful will probably bump into most visitors walking to their destinations. Most outsiders may see these conditions very hard to cope with day in and day out.

As a tenant I must find ways to adjust to these conditions that I live in. Although the complex can get rowdy at times, it usually settles down before sunset. I try to leave my home early to avoid the chaos. We have to share the laundry machines with other tenants, so I do my laundry during weekdays to avoid any possible conflicts. Although they aren't always very courteous, my neighbors can't reject a friendly greeting. By being a little careful I avoid contact with the small children.

As refugees, my family doesn't mind the small obstacles placed before us every single day. Instead of complaining about what we don't have, we find ways to make due with what we do have. Our home may not have the convenience of friendly neighbors or luxury of your own parking garage, but it still provides us with the essentials required for living.