Oedipus - Free Will Vs Fate

Essay by PaperNerd ContributorHigh School, 10th grade September 2001

download word file, 3 pages 0.0

Oedipus as the Puppet and the Puppeteer The misfortunes that befall Oedipus the King in Sophocles' play show a fundamental relationship between the will of the gods and man's free will. The ancient Greeks believed that the gods ruled the universe and had an irrefutable role in the conditions of man's existence. Man was free to make his own choices but was ultimately held responsible for his actions. The concepts of free will and fate play an integral role in Oedipus' destruction. Although he was a victim of fate, Oedipus was not completely controlled by it.

Inevitably, Oedipus will fulfill the prophecy delivered by the oracle before his birth. He tries to avoid his fate and believes that he has outsmarted the gods by leaving Corinth. He obviously believes in the concept of predestination but refuses to obey it himself. Like Laius and Jocasta, who tried to kill him after his birth, he sought ways to escape his horrible destiny.

The chorus takes the side of the gods and preaches their power throughout the play, only deviating from this position once. "But if any man comes striding, high and mighty/in all he says and does,/"¦let a rough doom tear him down." The mortal who ignores the laws of the Universe exhibits hubris and is doomed to fail. (Ode 2.972-82) If Oedipus manages to avoid the prophecy he will diminish belief in the power of the gods. A paradox surfaces when the chorus fears he may prove the gods wrong, but at the same time fears that the prophecies may prove to be true.

Although Oedipus shuns the idea of fate and the lack of free will, it is evident that he believes in and is fearful of them. After hearing rumors that he was not "his father's son", Oedipus...