"Overfishing of the Ocean" The essay is on sharkfinning and the effects it has on the ocean. It also gives information about overfishing and the depletion of certain species.

Essay by jughead214University, Bachelor'sB, March 2010

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Overfishing and Sharkfinning


Overfishing is defined simply as the process of various fishing activities reducing fish populations in oceans, lakes, or any body of water. There are three major types of overfishing; ecosystem overfishing, recruit overfishing, and growth overfishing. Ecosystem overfishing maybe the type of overfishing that is the most popular type which also means the biggest problem. In ecosystem overfishing the larger predatory fishes are fished out of the ocean when then it turn leaves the smaller type of fish to grow in abundance and disturbs the balance of the ecosystem. Recruit overfishing is when the adult population is decreased in number which means there are no adults to produce offspring. Finally there is growth overfishing, which is the type of overfishing in which fishes are caught smaller in size then they should be, which affects the species type of fish greatly. If overfishing isn't put to an end it not only brings down resources for the human population, but it also disrupts oceans ecosystems.

Overfishing has been a major problem for the Grand Banks of North America, The East China Sea of Asia, and the North Sea of Europe. In these three parts it has been crucial to stop overfishing. Recently the overfishing of sharks has lead to the disruption of marine ecosystems. The reason the shark population is so important to ecosystem is because they balance out most of it.


The overfishing of sharks has placed nine different species of sharks on the endangered list in 2008. In total over 30 species of sharks have been put on the endangered list, an the reason why the shark population is in danger is because sharks take a long time to mature, which in turn means there are no adults to produce offspring and help the shark...