The Romantic Qualities Found In William Wordsworth’s “The World Is Too Much With Us”

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The Romantic Qualities found in William Wordsworth's "The World is Too Much with Us" Romanticism was the start of imagination, freedom of thought and expression, the exploring of human feelings and emotions, and the heightened appreciation of nature. The start of Romanticism was a result of the Industrial revolution that swept across Europe, which was the migration from rural life towards technologically filled urban life. However, these advances, which led to mass production, also led to poor urban development, poor working conditions, pollution, and a life away from nature. In "The World is Too Much with Us," William Wordsworth expressed his feelings of this flight from simple, rustic life to the chaotic, urban life by using romantic qualities in this particular poem.

Wordsworth's first concept of Romanticism can be found in his use of creative texture, which requires people to search for the meaning of what they have just read: "For this, for everything, we are out of tune."

I believe what Wordsworth means is that we are out of tune with nature, a direct cause from Industrialization. The poet's characteristics of nature are used in writings to further his concept of Romanticism by exploiting the greedy flight to urban cities: "Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers. Little we see in nature is ours." I believe Wordsworth is saying that with everyone in industrialized cities, we do not utilize our full power, the little that we have, of nature. Some of the most important things in life can be easily found in nature. The emotions displayed by Wordsworth are clearly scene in this poem, which is another romantic quality. His views of urban life are negative, and that humans are sucked into greed, away from simplistic nature.