Statistics on crime in America confirm what we all know:

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Statistics on crime in America confirm what we all know: We live in an increasingly violence-ridden society. According to the most recent Uniform Crime Reports statistics (U.S. Department of Justice, 1994), 1,924,188 violent crimes (i.e., murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault) were reported to law enforcement officials in 1993. This number represents 746 violent crimes per 100,000 persons. Of violent crimes committed, 59% involved aggravated assault, 34% robbery, 5% forcible rape, and 1% murder.

The statistics for 1993 are even more alarming when longitudinal patterns are examined. Between 1989 and 1993, the violent crime rate increased 51.1%. The largest increase in crimes were for crimes committed by juveniles. Between 1984 and 1993, persons under the age of 18 arrested for violent crimes increased 67.6%, compared to an increase of 46.2% for persons 18 years and older. The number of murder victims in the 15-24 age group, the most murder prone, increased nearly 50% between 1975 and 1992.

Racial trends in crime statistics also are striking. The number of White individuals arrested for homicide rose 67% from 1970 to 1992, accounting for most of the overall increase in the national murder arrest total. Moreover, the number of White juvenile murder arrestees increased 204% and the number of White adult murder arrests was up 56% for the period 1970-92. The increase in the number of White juvenile arrestees was the largest among all racial groups by age classification. It is important to note that Black arrestees constituted 57.6% of total homicide arrests in 1993, and 62.3% of juvenile murder arrests. Black males are especially likely to be victims of murder. Indeed, homicide is now the leading cause of death for young Black males. The homicide rate for Black males ages 12-24 is 114.9 per 100,000 or 10...