Tom Sawyer Character Analysis

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Tom Sawyer Charater Analysis In Mark Twain'sThe Adventures of Tom Sawyer, honesty plays a very important role in the overall basis of the story. Throughout the book Tom battles with his conscience on issues of minor importance to situations of great importance that could decide the outcome of the lives of different major characters. It is these decision that deal with the honesty of Tom Sawyer that transform him from a mischievous little boy to a respectable, admirable young man and hero to himself and the town.

From the very beginning Tom has had a dishonest nature to him that defines his mischievous character. For example, "Tom pulled a boys hair, stuck a pin in another boy in order to hear him say "˜Ouch!'"� (26). This proves the immaturity that belongs to Tom. It is insignificant acts such as these that have earned him his reputation is the village.

In addition, "But it lacks somewhat of the true gush, was simply preposterous that this boy had warehoused two thousand sheaves of scriptural wisdom on his premises--a dozen would have strained his capacity, without a doubt"� (p31). As usual, Tom undermines the verses system by using his whitewashing winnings to buy enough tickets for a Bible, and the minister, and everyone else who knows Tom, realizes this. The fact that Tom cheated in earning the bible catches up with him later when he fails to answer the judge's question about the disciples.

Tom has yet to deal with any situation in a mature matter, every issue or situation that has confronted him has been solved in a boyish immature way. For example, Tom and Huck's immediate reaction after seeing the crime is to flee, both physically and symbolically, "Let Muff Potter do it, if he's fool enough.