A World Of Ego

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A World of Ego Within the story The Necklace, by Guy de Maupassant there is a woman who thought herself of a higher class than she actually was. Her name was Mathilde Loisel. She is tormented by the fact that she was born below her destined class or rank. Knowing that she could work her way to higher class with "natural fineness", and "suppleness of wit", she would let nothing get in her way of achieving that station in life. Now all she needed was an opportunity.

Mathilde had her chance when her husband received an invitation to a party at the palace of the Ministry. It was to be a fine event and Mathilde's husband worked as a clerk for the Ministry of Public Institution. She had nothing to wear and immediately dismissed her husband's chivalrous invitation. Her husband offered her some money to have a dress made and she asked, just by chance, for the same amount of money he had been saving for a special treat for himself.

A few days before the ball, she told her husband that she found it essential that an accessory be found for the dress. Something to adorn her with, a necklace, ring or bracelet of jewels or stones would make her presentable. She believed there was nothing more humiliating than to look poor among other women who were rich. This suggests she was insecure unless she looked rich, among the rich. this, and her husband thought her mad. If she had not spent so much time worrying, she might have thought to go ask her rich friend, Mme Forestier if she could borrow some jewelry. This advertises the fact that she desired things, but did not spend the time to think of a solution to acquire them. She set off the next day to get her precious, necessary jewels. She normally did not like to visit her rich friend because it made her feel homely when she returned to her house.

Mme Loisel must have her dress, and her jewels. She ends up with both. One of these borrowed. The necklace that she borrows from her friend is desperately needed, and she justifies her meticulousness when looking over all of the jewels presented. Even going to further to ask if she had any more to offer. Her fine toothed inspection of each and every piece of jewelry says that Mme Loisel considered this an extremely important decision. A diamond necklace was the final touch to achieve her wanted status. The only time she was at her friend's house was spent searching for jewels, not even staying for more than a second after. Once she found the necklace, she fled. This suggests that she was not a real friend to Mme Forestier, her rich friend. Her motives were all self-serving. She took advantage of Mme Forestier, and abused their friendship. Her ego and idea of being rich had always taken precedent over situations. She was selfish and was stuck in her own world of daydreams and hopes. She spent most moments thinking about how it would be if she were wealthy. The necklace was her tool. Mme Loisel was shallow enough to believe that the dress and necklace would give her the luck to look as beautiful and wealthy to live her fantasy. She had no consciousness of reality at this point. A person would think that she might have a high self-esteem. She did think very highly of herself but this confidence was founded on superficial ideals.

Mme Loisel daydreamed of "delicacies" and the "luxuries" she would have received if only she had been born into her destined family of wealth and class. The story begins by stating, "She was one of those pretty and charming girls who are sometimes, as if by a mistake of destiny, born into a family of clerks". However later stating, "since with woman there is neither caste nor rank: and beauty, grace and charm act instead of birth," she would never gain her desired status no matter what the case. She was lost in a world of ego.