Writing Style of Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss)

Essay by PahialiiUniversity, Master'sA+, June 2004

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Author Theodor Seuss Geisel created a writing style that has metamorphosed into its own separate category of unique vivacity coupled with a manipulation of everyday words and names to achieve rhymes or desired beats per line. The verse style found throughout most of Seuss's work was the anapestic tetrameter (Fenkl, 2002). This style involved using words consisting of two short syllables followed by one long syllable or using words consisting of two unstressed syllables followed by one stressed syllable. The verses were then compiled into groupings of four lines. Along with this metric method, Seuss also utilized italics, full capitalization, different colored words and different sized letters to steer the reader down the paths of his books.

Dr. Seuss's contributions stemmed beyond the creation of colorful words to beneficiating the illiterate. In response to a published article in Life Magazine in May of 1954 concerning the illiteracy among school children, Dr.

Seuss created a book using 220 words that were important to a young child's vocabulary. "The Cat in the Hat" went on to instant success and its beloved character is now the trademark of all Dr. Seuss's books (Bedno, 2002). However, Seuss's trademark fuzzy animals and weird shapes began earlier when the Yuzz-a-ma-Tuzz animal was created for "On Beyond Zebra," (Northern State University, 2002). Unsigned cartoons by Seuss would never be mistaken as his drawings were always filled with his trademark contraptions and creatures (Springfield Library et. al., 2002).

Although Seuss wrote many children's books with the goal of creating enjoyable reading to stimulate literary growth, many of his whimsical stories contained serious themes. Perhaps Dr. Seuss's biggest contribution was to introduce important concepts to his audience that spanned generations. Dr. Seuss admitted to having serious undertones in several of his fanciful children stories. His most obvious...