I wrote a review of the movie Napolean Dynamite. It examines the life of a young adolecent, Jon Heder, and the struggles he faces growing up. I recommend this movie to all.

Essay by wrzmstr2University, Master'sA+, November 2004

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When you are hurtling through adolescence, overcome with warring emotions and desperately trying to learn a whole new set of rules for status and interaction, everything you thought you knew seems suspect and even your own body is completely unfamiliar and terrifyingly out of control. It sometimes seems that the best anchor to keep you from levitating off the ground over the intense humiliation and the overwhelming injustice of it all is to adopt an air of ferocious perpetual exasperation and disdain. But what keeps you going are those few moments when a tantalizing glimpse of the possibility of pure pleasure provokes the ultimate accolade: "Sweet!"

So, when our eponymous hero, Napoleon Dynamite (Jon Heder) climbs onto the schoolbus and slumps into a seat in the back and an admiring younger kid asks him, "What are you going to do today, Napoleon?" his reply is, "Whatever I feel like I want to do! Gosh!" Then whatever he feels like he wants to do turns out to be tying a muscle man action figure to a string and throwing it out the window to pull along behind the bus.


And when he he opens the door to find a shy classmate peddling Glamour Shot photos and lanyard keychains, he disdainfully tells her, "I got like a finity of those I made in summer camp."

And when his older brother Kip (Aaron Ruell) taunts him, "Napoleon, don't be jealous that I've been chatting online with babes all day. Besides, we both know I'm trying to become a cage fighter," he replies, "Since when? We both know you've got like the worst reflexes of all time!" Then he has to try to prove it, and it appears that in the race for that title, they may be in a tie.