Essays Tagged: "Euripides"

The Characterization of Medea in Euripides and Ovid

The Medea by Euripides, Heroides XII: Medea to Jason by OvidBoth Fifth century B.C. playwright Euripides and Roma ... wever, they do not always share a perspective on the female matron's traits, behavior, and purpose. Euripides portrays a woman who reacts to injustice by beginning a crusade to avenge all who harmed h ... ing with emotions instead of with reason, and as a result, put themselves in regrettable situations.Euripides and Ovid present two entirely different sets of motivations for Medea's behavior which sur ...

(6 pages) 105 0 4.5 Feb/2004

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Classical Studies

Comparison of Medea and Clytemnestra, Euripides's Medea and Aeschylus's Agamemnon

Tragic heroes from Greek tragedies almost always share similar characteristics. Medea from Euripides's play Medea and Clytemnestra from Aeschylus's play Agamemnon display and share tragic tra ... edea does use brute force to kill her children.After getting her revenge Medea seems triumphant but Euripides and Medea herself suggest that she suffers worse than Jason. Medea's life becomes miserabl ...

(5 pages) 111 0 4.2 Mar/2004

Subjects: Humanities Essays

Discuss the life and works of Euripedes

. Actually that's maybe not too surprising considering he was born around 485BC somewhere in Athens.Euripides had a love of truth so he made many of his characters confront personal issues, not just q ... ue selves such as sexuality or expressing their emotions.Of the three great tragic poets of Greece, Euripides was by far the most modern. He brought realism in clothes, conversation and character to t ...

(2 pages) 50 0 3.0 Apr/2004

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Classical Studies > Greek Language & Literature

The Human Nature of Medea

Euripides' contemporaries and classical scholars alike point out the non-Aristotelean elements in Me ... olars alike point out the non-Aristotelean elements in Medea, this might intimidate today's reader. Euripides, instead of following the guidelines established by Aristotle in his Poetics, has a stirri ... eece have changed over the centuries, the basic human emotions such as anger, fear and passion that Euripides has written about have not. This makes his work more widely accepted and understood today ...

(8 pages) 95 0 4.5 Jul/2004

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Classical Studies > Greek Language & Literature

Essay discussing what can be learnt about Ancient Greece and its society from examining Euripides' play "The Bacchae" including bib

The third of the Three Great Playwrights of Ancient Greek Drama, Euripides who lived from 485 -406 B.C., is generally considered the most tragic and least polite of ... man of his times, participating enthusiastically in the social and political life of his community. Euripides wrote for Athens and the surrounding Attica, and these geographical and historical limits ... hrough its characters, themes and historical context provides an insight into Ancient Greek Society.Euripides was more than seventy years old and living in self-imposed exile in King Archelaus's court ...

(6 pages) 69 0 3.0 Nov/2004

Subjects: History Term Papers > European History

Analysis of Medea

umstances led him to become a villain that was insane and was led to death. This is also evident in Euripides's play Medea. The main character in the play, Medea, is a figure that possesses the traits ... es a character biased and either makes them a villain or heroic tragic figure. This is also true in Euripides's play Medea, where Medea is definitely a tragic hero. An example of this would be the mur ...

(3 pages) 66 1 3.0 Dec/2004

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Classical Studies > Greek Language & Literature

How do the characters of "Antigone" in Anouilh's play Antigone and "Medea" from Euripides's play Medea cope with the competition from other more beautiful and socially successful women?

nd it difficult to cope with competition of other women. Both Jean Anouilh in his play Antigone and Euripides in his play Medea have based their tragic plots on the roles of jealousy and spite and the ... mpression she gives us is that her desires all tend towards revenge. From very early on in the play Euripides shows her as a determined woman who wants to turn her jealousy and pain into an act of rev ...

(7 pages) 18 0 0.0 Mar/2006

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Classical Studies > Greek Language & Literature

The Bacchae

en. But did all men have this same view of women or did some have a different perspective of women. Euripides was one of these oddball men in their Greek society that didn't share the same views on wo ... use her services.Most Greek writing put down women and stood for the oppression of women. Where as Euripides's Bacchae refers to women in a different way a less possessive way. In the Bacchae Dionysu ...

(3 pages) 23 0 0.0 Oct/2001

Subjects: History Term Papers > European History

Euripides! master! how well yo

ate why I believe, contrary to widespread opinion and possible even his own, that Aristophanes, not Euripides, was, of the four major dramatists fo Athens' Golden Age, the one who least respected wome ... for evidences of, if I may comit an anchronism, chauvinism in the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. Consoled by the knoledge presented in the text that Aristophanes had accused Euripides of ...

(5 pages) 11 0 0.0 Feb/2008

Subjects: Art Essays > Drama

Tragic hero (media)

known as hmartia. Finally he must undergo a transition of happiness to misery called peripeteia. In Euripides' tragedy, Medea, Medea can be classified as an atypical tragic hero.To follow Aristotle's ... f a tragic hero, but not exactly in the usual ways a typical hero would. So it can be inferred that Euripides' Medea is a tragic and atypical hero.

(2 pages) 20 0 0.0 Feb/2008

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Classical Studies > Greek Language & Literature

The medea

In Euripides play, "The Medea", Medea is an example of a women who suffered from her stolen innocence. ...

(3 pages) 23 0 3.0 Feb/2008

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Classical Studies > Greek Language & Literature

Deeper philosophical meanings

One of ancient Greece's tragic plays in entitled "The Bacchae", written by Euripides. Many larger and deeper philosophical views are expressed in the play. The plot contains m ... ain points that they would be the moral. The actual moral, however, is almost impossible to define. Euripides uses a style of writing that is heavy with surreal details that are not present in other G ... god versus mortal, man versus woman, and good versus evil.Deep philosophical views are expressed in Euripides's play "The Bacchae". The speeches and certain points in the plot help illustrate the them ...

(3 pages) 415 0 0.0 Feb/2008

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Classical Studies > Greek Language & Literature

Agamemnon

further revenge in a vicious cycle. Is justice worth seeking? In Agamemnon and Medea, Aeschylus and Euripides give their answers to this question. Aeschylus seeks for redemption and true justice in Ag ... ds who pronounced the curse to begin with. Redemption for man entails the repentance of the gods.In Euripides? tragedy man is the evolutionary being of modern thought. Because his only purpose is to s ...

(5 pages) 26 1 0.0 Feb/2008

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Classical Studies > Greek Language & Literature

The Baccahe

The title of Wole Soyinka's play, The Bacchae of Euripides: A Communion Rite , clearly indicates that this play is associated with the original Bacch ... ommunion Rite , clearly indicates that this play is associated with the original Bacchae written by Euripides over 2000 years ago and its subtitle suggests the possibility of a theme relating to the C ... uence of Soyinka's African political and religious background that interweaves the original play by Euripides into his personal fight against the violation of human rights and political suppression, w ...

(9 pages) 13 0 0.0 Feb/2008

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature > Authors > Shakespeare

Guilt as a weapon in Medea

; Don't hide anything from your fellow servant! Tell me; and, if you wish, I'll keep it a secret." (Euripides 200) Essentially, the nurse is saying, "But, sir, we are family!" Servants comprised the l ... exceptional… I have been wronged, but I shall remain quiet, and submit to those above me." (Euripides 208) Medea tells the King of all the terrible hardships her intelligence as brought down u ...

(5 pages) 723 0 3.0 Feb/2008

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature

Medea by Euripides in Today's society

g to give up everything for that love. Another story that is relevant to today is Medea.Even though Euripides wrote Medea thousands of years ago by, any person, male or female, young or old, can take ...

(3 pages) 11 0 0.0 Apr/2008

Subjects: Literature Research Papers

Manage Change

esistance to such change. Perhaps the first to recognise such a connection was the Greek playwright Euripides when his character Iphigenia stated 'There is something in the pang of change more than th ... o adopt our own preparedness for change and continually seek the optimum change management approach.Euripides, 484 - 406 B.C., Euripides, (online), http://www.annabelle.net/topics/author.php?firstname ...

(9 pages) 78 0 5.0 May/2008

Subjects: Businesss Research Papers > Management

How is the allegory of the cave in Plato's Republic a good example of hubris; and how is hubris portrayed in Livy's, Thucydides', and Euripides' respective works of literature?

epublic a good example of hubris; and how is hubris portrayed in Livy’s, Thucydides’, and Euripides’ respective works of literature?Hubris is an important term when it comes to classica ... y or another by it. Hubris is in the cave allegory from Plato’s Republic, but also in parts of Euripides’ The Bacchae, Livy’s The Early History of Rome, and in Thucydides’ On Justi ...

(5 pages) 24 0 3.0 Feb/2009

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Philosophy

Assess the extent in which Euripides' tragedy 'The Trojan Women' is a reflection of the change in attitude to Athens' involvement in the Peloponnesian War

Euripides’ tragedy ‘The Trojan Women’ is a reflection of the changing attitude held t ... ion of the changing attitude held towards Athens’ involvement in the Peloponnesian War by both Euripides and Athenian society. Euripides establishes a clear political allusion between the Pelopon ... and controversial episodes of the Peloponnesian War illustrate the rising resentment of war held by Euripides and his audience. Greenstein comments “In both dialogue and subject matter Euripides& ...

(7 pages) 20 0 0.0 Apr/2009

Subjects: History Term Papers

Comparison of Sophocles' and Euripides' portrayal of humanity. Sophocles' is said to have portrayed men as they ought to be, while Euripides is said to have portrayed men "as they are"

The great poet Aristotle once said that Sophocles “portrayed men as they ought to be while Euripides portrayed men as they really are.” It can be argued that Sophocles did not portray an ... but even the antagonists in Sophocles’ plays were scrupulous. Furthermore, the manner in which Euripides portrays the characters in his plays adheres to a level of psychology unprecedented in his ...

(3 pages) 5287 0 0.0 Dec/2009

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Classical Studies > Greek Language & Literature