Essays Tagged: "ln"

King Lear

nnot heave my heart into my mouth. I love your Majesty according to my bond, no more no less.'(I,i, ln 91-93) Lear becomes enraged and casts her off saying, 'Here I disclaim all my paternal care, prop ... ity and property of blood, and as a stranger to my heart and me hold this from thee for ever.'(I,i, ln 113-116). Some think that Cordelia was prideful, or even a fool in her response, but I believe sh ...

(6 pages) 48 0 4.6 Nov/1996

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature > Authors > Shakespeare

Motifs involved in the play "King Lear" by Shakespeare. Includes Goneril's speech

e that makes breath poor, and speech unable;Beyond all manner of so much I love you.' (Act I, Sc i, Ln 57-63)and after she had been allotted one half of the kingdom:''Tis his own blame; hath put himse ... om:''Tis his own blame; hath put himself from rest,And must needs taste his folly.' (Act II, Sc ii, Ln 289-290)They both were interested only in getting Lear's land, and used any means necessary to ge ...

(2 pages) 30 0 3.5 Mar/1997

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature > Authors > Shakespeare

Systemtheorie - Allgemeine Definitionen

nt auftreten könnte, dann ist der mittlere Informationsinhalt des Systems:I(t)=-SUM k=0n pk(t) ln pk(t)Diese Information bezieht sich - wie gesagt - auf einen Zeitpunkt und gilt auf Grund der Ges ... g läßt sich so interpretieren, daß der Informationswert eines jeden Ereignisses Ik=lnpk ist. Wenn ein Ereignis selten auftritt, dann ist der Informationsgehalt um so größer ...

(42 pages) 56 1 4.5 Jan/2003

Subjects: Art Essays > Film & TV Studies

Poetry Analysis of "Batter My Heart, Three Personed God, For You" by: John Donne

lustrates his despondency simply because of its harshness. (He requests to have his heart battered.-ln 1) As he continues in prayer, the character becomes more distraught. He explains his feelings of ... hat seems to be the opposite direction. He requests to be overthrown so that he may rise and stand (ln 3), and even more vividly to be ravished only so he can become chaste (ln 14). In nearly every se ...

(3 pages) 18329 0 3.0 Feb/2003

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature > Poetry

Comparative Paper of Adrienne Rich's "Living in Sin" and Philip Larkin's "Home is Sad". These are two American modern poets.

stanza describes the house staying exactly the way its residents left it "as if to win them back" (ln 3). The poem is about people growing up and changing. As they do, they leave behind what used to ... itself. The beginning of the poem does describe things like the dusty furniture, and leaky faucet (ln 3-4), but the engine behind the poem is the way everyday life in this house makes it sad (which i ...

(3 pages) 57 1 5.0 Feb/2003

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > North American > Poetry

Brief Analysis of industrial work, politics, law, and foreign relations from the Civil War to World War I.

In the decades after the Civil War, an "Engine of Change" spread across America (LN 9/11). This engine had five chief causes: government assistance, availability of resources, human ... d not have jobs industrial in nature, but retained skilled trades such as men's clothing and shoes (LN 9/11). This would soon change over the next few decades as Big Business transformed the labor for ... orkers would now have to work around the clock and leave the traditional holiday of "Saint Monday" (LN 9/18). Factories lacked oversight and standards and were dangerous places to the laborers. These ...

(7 pages) 128 1 4.2 Oct/2003

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History > North American Wars

Sophocles' 'Oedipus The King' - Was Oedipus a victim of hubris or a victim of the gods?

edipus was bitter indeed. By the end of 'Oedipus the King', he and his fate are seen as "Luckless" (Ln 1195) and objects to "envy not at all" (Ln 1196). But what was it that caused this man to sleep w ... t man's protests and he sentences Creon to death saying "No, certainly; kill you, not banish you." (Ln 625) This was a terrible thing to do, a decision made rashly, a decision made with much hubris. T ...

(5 pages) 161 0 4.3 Feb/2004

Subjects: Literature Research Papers

"The Scientist" by Janet Burroway: Commonality within the Skull

he poem opens with the male scientist explaining how "There is nothing mysterious about the skull" (ln 1), and the female poet having made an inquiry about the skull. With what would traditionally be ... l. "Cranium, formed of the commonest elements; / Weighing nine ounces, worth about fourteen cents" (ln 18-19). From this view the scientist looks at this structure with a trained eye, thus within boun ...

(4 pages) 21 0 5.0 Mar/2004

Subjects: Literature Research Papers

Sir Gawain and The Green Knight

ity, happiness and a closeness to God; while the world outside represents wilderness, danger, and vulnerability to evil. This binary is very significant in that it helps the reader to understand the l ... Arrayed of the round table rightful brothers, / With feasting and fellowship and carefree mirth." (ln 37-35). This quote demonstrate the lack of fear displayed by the people while they are within the ...

(5 pages) 59 0 4.0 May/2004

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > World Literature

Macbeth

ople and even proclaimed deceitful Macbeth his "valiant cousin and worthy gentlemen." (Act 1, sc.2, Ln. 26) The Thane of Cawdor and Macbeth are just two examples of those traitors that King Duncan hig ... ssisted by that most disloyal traitor the Thane of Cawdor, began a dismal conflict." (Act 1, sc. 2, Ln. 58-61) I believe that he was too cowardly to stay on Scotland's side in believing they would los ...

(3 pages) 41 1 3.9 Jun/2004

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature > Authors > Shakespeare > Macbeth

ABOUT "KING LEAR" by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

nnot heave my heart into my mouth. I love your Majesty according to my bond, no more no less."(I,i, ln 91-93) Lear becomes enraged and casts !her off saying, "Here I disclaim all my paternal care, pro ... ity and property of blood, and as a stranger to my heart and me hold this from thee for ever."(I,i, ln 113-116). Some think that Cordelia was prideful, or even a fool in her response, but I believe sh ...

(6 pages) 473 0 0.0 Jun/2005

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature > Authors > Shakespeare

Symbols of Poe's poem The Bells

ple spirits of the time. The bells of the sleigh "tinkle, tinkle tinkle, in the icy air of night," (ln 5-6) just like the bells of the ever-popular winter song, "Jingle Bells." He uses the word tintin ... stulation with the deaf and frantic fire, Leaping higher, higher, higher, With a desperate desire" (ln 42-7) these sounds implies franticness and the feeling of urgency. The words seem to pick up pace ...

(2 pages) 9 0 0.0 Aug/2005

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature > Poetry

"Thanatopsis" by William Bryant.

beauty, and she glides Into his darker musings with a mild And healing sympathy that steals away." (ln 1-7) Bryant also refers to death as a slumber. "All that tread the globe are but a handful to the ... as a slumber. "All that tread the globe are but a handful to the tribes that slumber in its bosom" (ln 48-50) Sleep is natural to life and death is as natural as sleep. One should not fear death. With ...

(2 pages) 22 0 0.0 Nov/2005

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > North American > Poetry

Dialectic Journal of the poems "Beowulf", "Grendel", "Tyger", "The Snowman", and "Dreamers" focusing mainly on literary techniques.

armor...Will the seamen that sailed her sighted the landShining cliffs and coastwise hills," (p14, ln 74-83)The use of consonance here repeats the sound of the wind. Beowulf and his men are going to ... f a swift and light wind, not a treacherous gust."Foam on her breast, like a bird she flew;" (p 14, ln79)This quote uses personification and smile. The author personifies the ship calling it a she. On ...

(7 pages) 14 0 0.0 Feb/2006

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature > Poetry

"To Coy His Mistress" Poetry Explication

ld enough, and time, (if we were to live forever I'd seduce you)This coyness, lady, were no crime. (Ln 1-2 interruption, comfortable with slowness of time)We would sit down, and think which wayTo walk ...

(1 pages) 21 0 0.0 Mar/2006

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > North American > Poetry

Mayor Of Casterbridge Questions 5

s "That Elizibeth- Jane Farfrae be not told of my death, or made to grieve on account of me"(Pg 251 Ln 20-21) ,you realize how wrong that request really is. "O I would have minded so much if it had be ... "O I would have minded so much if it had been not for my unkindness at that last parting" (Pg. 251 Ln. 33-34), by the given response we realize how much Elizibeth really cared for her father even in ...

(1 pages) 382 0 0.0 Aug/2001

Subjects: Literature Research Papers

Romantisisam

ough out the whole poem and closes with " Thy lot, methinks, were Heaven, thy age, Eternity!"(Ln 14) He closes with this saying that even in heaven their love would last through all of eternity. ... tion and great feeling to Asra. "Could I transmute the whole to one rich Dower Of Happy Life"(Ln 12-13) He will forever love her and wants to share happiness with her forever. His use of ...

(2 pages) 780 0 0.0 Nov/2001

Subjects: Literature Research Papers

A Comparison between "Beowulf" and "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"

he man most gracious and fair-minded, / kindest to his people and keenest to win fame," (Beowulf 97 ln. 3180-82). This is a description of the great king Beowulf, from the epic poem of the same name. ... r, your courtesy are higest acclaimed / By lords and by ladies, by all living men," (Sir Gawain 139 ln. 1226-29). This is a description of Sir Gawain, from the romantic poem Sir Gawain and the Green K ...

(5 pages) 33 0 0.0 Nov/2007

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature

Consider how William Wordsworth in The Prelude and Lord Byron in Don Juan discuss the themes of individual and collective history.

few incidences shared below.Wordsworth sees his calling as a 'Prophet of Nature' (Wordsworth, Bk13, ln 441, 446-8) and his role is to instruct man on how they should live. Since young, he sees himself ... oy to Wordsworth, as seen in swimming naked as a 'Boy' makes him one with nature (Wordsworth, Bk 1, ln 291-6) Nature is also a teacher to Wordsworth, such as ministering his mistakes. (Bygrave, 120) T ...

(6 pages) 17 0 0.0 Apr/2008

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > European Literature

The Fall of Aeneas at the Conclusion of Virgil's "Aeneid"

ant this to be a dishonorable and negative action. "Blazing up and terrible in his anger" (bk. XII, ln. 1289-1290) is used to describe Aeneas right before he "sank his blade in fury" (ln. 1295) into T ... sentences of the epic. "And with a groan for that indignity his spirit fled into the gloom below" (ln. 1297-1298). To call Turnus' death an indignity, served to him by Aeneas, is a clear condemnation ...

(4 pages) 14 0 2.0 Nov/2009

Subjects: Humanities Essays > Religion & Faith > Christianity