Essays Tagged: "thirteen states"

Federalism vs. Anti-Federalism. Who could set rules and regulations for The States?

though it would only take the approval of nine states, the founding fathers wanted the approval all thirteen states as to create a lasting union that would not come about, if done so grudgingly.Each s ...

(3 pages) 133 0 4.0 Mar/1997

Subjects: Law & Government Essays > Government

Aaron Burr, father of the political machine

AFTER the Revolution, chaos. Nothing could exceed the confusion and petty antagonisms of the thirteen states at the close of the Revolutionary War. The bond that had united their sympathies and ... or Columbian Order." The organization was entirely anti-English. The officers were: a Great Father, thirteen Sachems, a Sagamore or Master of Ceremonies, a Winkiskee or Doorkeeper, and a Scribe. At fi ...

(52 pages) 201 0 4.7 Dec/2002

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

Too Much Democracy?

Back in 1776 when the United States was only composed of thirteen states and the American people of those states had a fear of a powerful national government ...

(2 pages) 40 0 1.7 Nov/2003

Subjects: Law & Government Essays

This essay is about the American Constitution during 1787

ederalists because they wanted a federal system of government- a national government, combining all thirteen states under one. It would deal with the nation's problems as a whole especially economic o ...

(2 pages) 41 0 5.0 Dec/2003

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

Creation of the articles of confederation

ticles of Confederation or other wise known as the Articles ofConfusion, was eventually drawn up by thirteen states. This provided for a looseconfederation or "firm league of friendship" between the t ...

(1 pages) 30 0 4.0 Feb/2004

Subjects: History Term Papers

Essay on how the constitution was formed

f Confederation. This provided for a loose confederation or "firm league of friendship" between the thirteen states, and together took joint action in dealing with common problems. This document ultim ...

(3 pages) 62 1 4.7 Feb/2004

Subjects: History Term Papers

What were the main issues of debate and controversy in the creation of the federal constitution of 1787 and how were they resolved?

rpose of revising the articles of Confederation' . It had been intended to bring delegates from all thirteen states in order to clarify in constitutional form many issues but above all to ensure and s ... larify in constitutional form many issues but above all to ensure and strengthen the union of these thirteen states. However such a task would prove very difficult as a result of the many centrifugal ...

(7 pages) 78 0 4.0 Apr/2004

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

How effective was the Articles of Confederation and did the Constituion solve these problems

cles.First, in order for any measure to be passed by Congress, approval was required by nine of the thirteen states. Congress was very limited in its powers. They did not have the power to levy taxes ... itution. In order for this new document to be accepted, the founding fathers now needed nine of the thirteen states to vote in favor . On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire became the ninth state to accept ...

(3 pages) 57 1 5.0 Jun/2004

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

The Articles of Confederation

il 1787. Under the Articles, Congress was the sole organ of government. Also under the Articles the thirteen states had most of the power, which led into many problems. Some of the many problems were ... n what security has a man for life, liberty, or property? He also expresses his concern that if all thirteen states cause problems with each other, eventually it will cause the federal government into ...

(4 pages) 74 0 3.0 Jun/2004

Subjects: Law & Government Essays > Government

Election 2004

chance of winning the election, although I want him to. In fact, he is excluded from the ballot in thirteen states. The main reason I would want Nader to win is because he shares many of the same vie ...

(6 pages) 47 0 5.0 Nov/2004

Subjects: Law & Government Essays

The Necessity of a New Constitution

The Articles of Confederation was a fairly loose agreement between the thirteen colonies that was created and ratified during the Revolutionary War. Its two most crippling ... The idea was further considered in the Annapolis Convention of 1786 until delegates from all of the thirteen states came together in Philadelphia in 1787 for the purpose of amending the Articles of Co ... elegations. The Annapolis Convention submitted a report to the Continental Congress and each of the thirteen states that proposed a larger meeting, which was agreed to by the Congress. Had the Article ...

(4 pages) 61 1 4.3 Dec/2004

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

Why did the Southern states secede in 1861?

tal differences in agriculture and resultant adoption of slavery in the South. From early days, the thirteen states had grown up separately, and each had their own culture and beliefs, which were ofte ...

(7 pages) 63 0 4.7 Feb/2005

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

Separation of Powers

ry important purpose. The purpose of the Articles of Confederation was to create a confederation of thirteen states. The purpose of the Constitution was to revise the Articles of Confederation so that ...

(3 pages) 97 0 0.0 Apr/2006

Subjects: Social Science Essays > Political Science

The Articles of Confederation (A Document Based Question) (Documents not included)

hat they would meet at Philadelphia to draft a new Constitution. Representatives from twelve of the thirteen states arrived at Independence Hall in the spring of 1787. This Constitution established a ... ded. (Stated by George Washington in document F)In the spring of 1787, delegates from twelve of the thirteen colonies arrived at Independence Hall, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with intent to revise ...

(4 pages) 22 0 0.0 Apr/2006

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

Alcohol

he prohibition movement gained strength. The movement succeeded in establishing prohibition laws in thirteen states, but in 1865 they were repealed. In 1919 the U.S. Congress adopted the eighteenth am ...

(5 pages) 57 0 5.0 Jun/2007

Subjects: Social Science Essays > Controversial Issues > Drugs & Alchohol

Womens Voting Rights

Michigan being the first and Washington being the thirty-fifth. This left one out of the remaining thirteen states who had to ratify. However, Virginia, Massachusetts, Louisiana, Delaware, South Caro ...

(8 pages) 59 0 3.0 Aug/2001

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

Westward Expansion

ing, bit by bit people moved farther from waterways, and early westward expansion began.In 1776 the thirteen English colonies became the United States of America. On early maps drawn of the United Sta ... tes, the western boundaries of the states extended forever. No one knew much of what lay beyond the thirteen states.During the time between 1776 - 1803 the United Sates grew and new states were added. ...

(5 pages) 105 0 3.0 Sep/2001

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

How Has The Thirteen United States Grown As A Society?

How has the Thirteen United States grown as a society? By declaring their independence to the King of En ... n as a society? By declaring their independence to the King of England on July 4, 1776, the Thirteen United States of America showed that they no longer needed the British sovereignty and that ... wing. They were ready to fly, like every new born bird when it is ready to survive on its own. The thirteen states, over many many decades, had grown into an educated, matured, strong society that un ...

(2 pages) 313 0 0.0 Nov/2001

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

Continental congress

ongress ratified a weaker version of the Articles of Confederation. The ratification put all of the thirteen states under one central government. The Articles reserved to each state "it's sovereignty, ...

(3 pages) 355 0 0.0 Feb/2008

Subjects: Social Science Essays > Political Science

Joshua larwence chamberlin

s like before I was born. In 1788 the United States became an independent nation. It was made up of thirteen states and owned several territories on the western side of the Mississippi River. The coun ...

(11 pages) 728 0 5.0 Feb/2008

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History