Essay by Anonymous UserUniversity, Bachelor'sA+, September 1996

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Ian Burke 9-23-96


Pulp Fiction Style

Pulp Fiction is like boot camp for the Marines. You come into it from your civilized life, they subject you to violent language until you're numb, they abuse you verbally and physically until all of your normal feelings and values are reduced to dust. Leaving you aware that you have changed, and able to describe the change, you find yourself questioning the person you were previously. First thing you know you're saluting. This story is a cleverly disorienting journey through a landscape of danger, shock, hilarity, and vibrant local color. Nothing is predictable or familiar within this irresistibly bizarre world. You do not merely enter a theater to see Pulp Fiction: you go down a rabbit hole.

Theater is an actor moving through time and space, telling a story. In Quentin Terintenio's, Pulp Fiction, the actors portray savvy modern-day gangsters and the story is three stories told in backwards order.

To say the least this not your average story. The theme of the story is redemption, and the journey to achieve that redemption. The characters are colorfully multidimensional and most importantly they are believable.

The language of the story is street-smart and confident, like the characters. There is no main plot, only mirror plots that are reflections of each other.

The theme of redemption is portrayed by two of the main characters of the story. These characters seek redemption and a new way of life, they each desire a more virtuous life. Butch (Bruce Willis) wants to pull off one last scam and then run away with the woman he loves. He seeks forgiveness and redemption through the future birth of his child. He wants his child to have a healthy childhood so that he will have the opportunity to hand...