Essays Tagged: "Central government"

Explain the impact of the Articles of the Confederation on the Constitutional Convention of 1787. How were the imperfections of the Articles ‘corrected’ with the new constitution?

of American government from 1781. The articles bound states together, but this tie was so weak that central government was impossible. "A national government should have the ability to enforce its aut ... iendship," was intentional on the part of the founders, who did not want to produce a well-ordered, central government. In their opinion, the sovereign states were "order-centered" in themselves. 5 Th ...

(7 pages) 524 3 4.6 Mar/2002

Subjects: Law & Government Essays > Government

Federalism

nment control the same territory and citizens. Countries with federal political systems have both a central government and governments based in smaller political units, usually called states, province ... inces, or territories. These smaller political units surrender some of their political power to the central government, relying on it to act for the common good. In a federal system, laws are made bot ...

(4 pages) 388 3 4.7 Mar/2002

Subjects: Law & Government Essays

What led up to the signing of the American Constitution.

created the federal government, but which had restricted itspower because of the colonists' fear of central government.The restriction was so severe that the national government was unable to function ... was a shambles,and commerce was at a standstill. Even though there was still strong resistance to acentral federal authority, the states were forced to accept the new federal Constitution.The alterna ...

(2 pages) 82 0 4.0 May/2002

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

Federalists vs. Anti-federalists

revolutionary war in order to get independence many Americans didn't want to give any power to the central government. They feared that it might become another monarchy. This is where the anti-federa ... This is where the anti-federalists came from. Other people thought that there needs to be a strong central government. These people were federalists. In order to protect itself, collect taxes, and ha ...

(2 pages) 145 1 3.4 May/2002

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

The American Revolution of 1789

gree turn on its axis of governmental philosophy. America went from a period of tyranny by a strong central government under the king and Parliment of Great Britain to government by a loosly connected ... nation, but as a loose league of friends. The original planners were so afraid of the power of the central government due to Britain's poor treatment of the colonies that they failed to give the cent ...

(4 pages) 73 0 3.0 Sep/1995

Subjects: Literature Research Papers > North American

The Downfall of the Middle Ages. The decline of the feudal system, and the declination of the Church's power over the nation-states

ite place and a definite role, with the power resting in the hands of the local lords (instead of a central government). The lords, or nobles, lost power after the Crusades, when the Europeans came in ...

(2 pages) 125 1 5.0 Oct/1996

Subjects: History Term Papers

Who's the Boss?

ot only inspire patriotism but also a guideline for a balanced government. Our forefathers wanted a central government that was strong enough to run the United States but not absolute. They separated ...

(3 pages) 101 1 3.7 Oct/2002

Subjects: Law & Government Essays

The history of Federalism in the United States and it's roots, meaning, and effects.

at we have come to study of federalism is: A political system in which power is divided between the central government and its two component parts- in the United States, between the national governmen ...

(5 pages) 262 1 2.1 Nov/2002

Subjects: Law & Government Essays > Government

What were the effects of Roman Imperialism? Include both, the effects on Rome, and the conquered peoples.

of the Romans was the ever-extending size of their empire. It was certainly a difficult job for the central government to control the whole empire. When power was distributed among governors, civil wa ... be said that they were somewhat oppressed by the Romans, but they were not wholly tyrannized by the central government and Roman governors. Clearly, as seen above, the effects of Roman Imperialism hel ...

(4 pages) 76 0 4.6 Dec/2002

Subjects: History Term Papers > European History > Roman History

Alexander Hamilton Biography-2 pages paragraphs including -introduction -early life -before the Revolution and during the revolution -during and after the revolution -later years

ing the ratification of the Constitution. The document had said many good points of having a strong central government, and had said many of the bad points of the Articles of Confederation that had a ... selected to serve in the Continental Congress of 1782-83. At the Congress, he disputed for a strong central government. He then returned to the practicing of law, and became one of the best lawyers in ...

(5 pages) 93 0 4.4 Jan/2003

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

"Chemical Warfare": lists types and effects of weapons and means of delivery

other morning commute on the crowded Tokyo subway system. Destination of this particular train: the central government district in Tokyo.A man wearing sunglasses boards the train, then immediately get ...

(4 pages) 60 0 4.5 Feb/2003

Subjects: Law & Government Essays > Military & International Conflicts & Security

Compare and Contrast the Central-Local Relationship in the UK system and the US system.

There are many differences between the central local government relationships in the US and the UK system. The first major difference has t ... but they are nowhere as powerful as the states in the US. They are still following what ever their central government tells them to do. In the US the degree of separation is much greater. The states ... ution clearly defines what powers the states hold and anything that is not mentioned is left to the central Federal government. However, since the formation of the constitution and the separation of p ...

(4 pages) 88 2 4.0 Feb/2003

Subjects: Law & Government Essays > Government > European Union

Federilism

o political factions. Hamilton and his colleagues, the original Federalists, believed only a strong central government could provide the new nation with the economic, political and military cohesivene ... a government as the greatest threat to that new-found liberty, and feared that by creating a strong central government they were replacing one tyranny with another. In addition, the Antifederalists be ...

(1 pages) 31 1 3.4 Feb/2003

Subjects: Law & Government Essays

Short report on the Ratification Debate. Federalists/Anti-Federalists. 581 words.

hasized the weaknesses in the Articles of Confederation and the desirability and need of a stronger central government. They were also concerned about the safeguards of the new Constitution. The Anti- ...

(2 pages) 85 0 3.7 Mar/2003

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

The process of federation in Australia

for most to identify with the idea of everyone belonging to a nation first and being governed by a central government. These beliefs were what separated the colonies pre 1880s.However, throughout the ...

(3 pages) 81 0 3.6 Mar/2003

Subjects: History Term Papers > Australian History

Hobbes vs. Locke--Who Was Correct?

n these two ways. In Locke's view, man's intentions are benevolent by nature and can live without a central government telling them what exactly to do. Hobbes, the antagonist, believes the complete op ... antagonist, believes the complete opposite--that man is brutal by nature and cannot live without a central government running everyone's life. In today's society, Hobbes's philosophy on man is much m ...

(4 pages) 84 0 4.0 Apr/2003

Subjects: Social Science Essays > Political Science > Political Theory

Federal and unitary systems of government.

are the legal sovereignty of a country. Each tier of government has its own specific functions. The central government is allocated with the external political issues i.e. Foreign affairs and national ... n which state you are examining.Unitary governments when a country's sovereignty lies solely with a central tier of government. Subnational authorities do exist alongside the centre and they may make ...

(5 pages) 21768 0 4.2 Apr/2003

Subjects: Law & Government Essays > Government

Federalist Vs. Anti-federalist.

ernment. All the states were connected by the Articles of Confederation, but that document gave the central government no power. Because the central government had no power, it cause many problems. It ... ower, it cause many problems. It was decided that a document needed to be created to strengthen the central government. The Constitution was made. When this happened it brought a division among the Am ...

(2 pages) 126 1 4.1 May/2003

Subjects: Social Science Essays > Political Science > Political Theory

Articles of confederation.

of American government from 1781. The articles bound states together, but this tie was so weak that central government was impossible. A national government should have the ability to enforce its auth ... cts. The articles created a loose confederation of independent states that gave limited powers to a central government. The national government would consist of a single house of Congress, where each ...

(3 pages) 82 0 3.7 May/2003

Subjects: History Term Papers > North American History

Summary of the "Federalist Papers".

h of the criticisms of the plan.Opponents to the new plan criticize it most on it creating a strong central government that will be abusive to individual liberty. However, an energetic government is c ... l for the United States because it extends the advantages of popular government, in the form of the central government, without reducing the compactness, in the form of the state governments that reta ...

(4 pages) 165 2 4.8 Sep/2003

Subjects: Social Science Essays > Political Science > Political Theory